From Gyms to Beaches: Navigating the New Normal

It’s crazy that activities we didn’t even think twice about less than a year ago now feel like they have to slowly be eased into again. Going to the gym? Haven’t heard of her. Movie theaters? No recollection… As more and more opens up though, it’s important that we gauge our comfort levels and keep checking in with ourselves. Because as nice as total isolation was (NOT), we’re probably finding ourselves more willing to journey out than we have in months. I told you about my experience in NYC a few weeks ago. Since then I’ve been coming out of my Corona shell little by little and taking note of how to stay safe as we navigate the new normal.


I recently attended an outdoor spin class at Revolve, the first type of group exercise I’ve done in wayyy too long. The rule was that everyone must wear a mask until sitting on their bike. I have to say, I felt pretty comfortable with this. Even better was that all the bikes were brought outside in the parking lot and spaced out. Being outside gave a cool energy to the class and made it a no brainer for me to try. In speaking with the spin instructor, I found out that even when gyms are able to open in New York throughout the next few weeks, Revolve will still host its outdoor rides with the expectation that people won’t be entirely comfortable working out indoors again. I couldn’t agree more and can’t help but feel for the gyms and studios who don’t have the luxury to host classes in their own space outside.




When the spin class was over, you were on your own to stay spaced out while going inside to return rented spin shoes and lather in hand sanitizer. I’ve noticed that this is where we as a society struggle a bit. When there’s no tape on the floor or physical indication of how to disperse, it can be difficult to actually keep your distance from people. I’m sure you’ve experienced this at various points in your ventures as well. What do we do when we’re in situations where it’s hard to regulate 6 feet? Like at the beach for instance…



This past weekend I took a trip to Robert Moses Beach and walked down to Fire Island. I saw a lot of seagulls and crabs but did not see many masks! Of course, at a beach it should be a bit easier to spread out, but I still wore my mask until I plopped happily in my spot. A that point I felt completely comfortable to work on my tan and chill out sans mask. But once I got to Fire Island and strolled through the town and its tiny walkways, it was even harder to stay away from people. The mask wearing was just as lacking as it was on the beach, which I can imagine partially stems the carefree summer spirit that a beach town brings. It’s easy to forget all about COVID. And after a long few months, the last thing we want to do is be reminded of this earth-changing illness while we’re enjoying activities that bring us back to the pre-pandemic world.



So what’s the verdict? After slowly, but surely easing ourselves back into society, we’ve learned a thing or two haven’t we? From my experience, it’s nearly impossible to stay 6 feet away from people at all times, especially in places that are hard to regulate (yeah I’m looking at you, NYC subway!) This is why it’s absolutely crucial to be disciplined with our mask wearing. I really look at it as a sign of respect because as recent reports have shown, while wearing a mask certainly does prevent you from contracting COVID, it’s most effective as a way of source control (aka preventing you from spreading it if you have it). Here at Anjé, we’re happy to not only offer pre-designed and customizable masks, but to be able to donate part of the proceeds of every mask sold to Hackensack Meridian Health's COVID-19 Response Fund 😊. So grab your mask with some attitude and let’s continue to embrace the new normal!



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

How have you navigated the new normal? And where does your comfort level start and end? Let us know by commenting below!


Share this post


Leave a comment

Note, comments must be approved before they are published